Community

Malaria and Emerging Drug Resistance in Myanmar

Myanmar has historically been a regional epicenter of spreading resistance to vital anti-malarial drugs, and currently records Ithe second most malaria deaths of any country in Southeast Asia. The situation is worst in the remote and underserved ethnic minority border regions, which are largely inaccessible to large-scale international efforts.

HEALTH

Safe births, children who have essential immunizations and enough to eat, prevention and treatment of infectious disease, community health education — these are the foundations for healthy, vigorous communities.

Coming Together

Community Partners International emerged out of a trip through the villages of Burma/Myanmar, with the executive directors of Foundation for the People of Burma and the Global Health Access Program, and a donor for both organizations traveling together to visit local partners and program sites.

The trio quickly discovered synergy and a common vision: Over meals and dusty back roads, they shared experiences, their rich knowledge of the region and ideas for approaching the vast community and health needs in Burma/Myanmar.

Dr. Lay Khin Kay and the B.K. Kee Foundation

The B.K.Kee Foundation $25,000 match fund for CPI — we met our goal!!
 
We're grateful to the B.K.Kee Foundation for this opportunity — and to the generous CPI donors who helped us re

Your Support At Work

Please partner with us — Your generous gift makes a difference!

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$40 treats one severely malnourished child in a therapeutic feeding program. In villages in eastern Myanmar, one-third of all children are malnourished.

The Mae Tao Clinic: Two Decades of Health and Healing on the Thai-Myanmar Border

In 1989, a few months after leaving Myanmar, Dr. Cynthia Maung and a small group of students opened a makeshift medical clinic in a rickety wooden house on the dusty outskirts of Mae Sot, Thailand. The clinic had virtually no supplies, no money, no one who spoke Thai and (except for Dr. Cynthia) no staff formally trained in medicine.

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